• People picnicking on the occasion of the Metalworkers’ Day – a popular local holiday.
  • City fair on the occasion of the Metalworkers’ Day – a popular local holiday; a new Orthodox church built on steel mill’s money is visible in the background.
  • A painted portrait of the WWII-era mill manager - Grigory Nosov - and his desk preserved at the mill museum.
  • A kiosk selling balloons and flags on the occasion of the Metalworkers’ Day – a popular local holiday.
  • Mill site.
  • View across the polluted Ural River to the Magnitogorsk Steel Mill (MMK). The river marks the geographical border between Europe and Asia; the mill sits on the Asian side.
  • Lost gloves.
  • A decorative statue in a park in central Magnitogorsk.
  • A man at work at the Magnitogorsk Steel Mill. Poor safety causes accidents which are skillfully concealed while air pollutants such as heavy metals, sulfur dioxide and lead made almost the entire population of Magnitka a hostage of the mill.
  • View from the European side of the Ural River to the industrial area on the Asian side.
  • A WWII memorial called From Hinterland to Frontline in central Magnitogorsk. During WWII, the Magnitogorsk Steel Mill played an important role in supplying the Red Army with steel and armour. The mill fumes can be seen in the background across the river.
  • Denis N. Kotelnikov, ataman (chieftain) of the Magnitogorsk Cossack Community. Cossacks are a subethnic group of Russians or Ukrainians known for their independent and sometimes rebellious character although the tsars always used them as border guards against Turkic and other invaders. They had their own administrative regions (the Hosts) during tsarist times and were severely persecuted under Soviets. Once part of the Orenburg Cossack Host, this part of Chelyabinsk Region now sees the Cossacks' attempts to revive their traditional values and paramilitary lifestyle through various government and non-government activities including charity, children education, small and medium business, policing, etc. Before the city of Magnitogorsk was founded in 1929, a Cossack village - Stanitsa Magnitnaya - existed here for almost 200 years.
  • River Ural within Magnitogorsk. During construction of the Magnitogorsk Steel Mill in late 1920s - early 1930s, the river Ural was dammed and formed several ponds. The river divides the city into two parts and also marks the geographical border between Europe and Asia. The mill and the older part of the city built in the 1930s are located on the Asian side, the newer city - on the European side of the Ural.
  • A street scene in one of the most polluted areas of the city. Although efforts did take place in the last few years to improve the mill’s environmental record, the city is still subjected to harmful effects of pollution and disease. According to local statistics, only 1% of children here are healthy.
  • Tamara Semenovna, a night security guard at a school, with her dog.
  • A roadside memorial
  • The steel mill covers a huge area of 118 sq. km.